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Saturday, March 10, 2018

Stone Cold Sober--A Pregnant Investigator on the Case

Publicist Wiley Saichek is  actually listed in the acknowledgements of  Stone Cold Sober by Rebecca Marks.  This is the third mystery in the Dana Cohen series.   Dana is a retired NYPD officer in her late forties who nevertheless finds herself in the middle of criminal investigations.   I decided  to try out this series.  Stone Cold Sober looked like the one that I would be most likely to enjoy because it involves an amateur theatrical production which reminds me of my own participation in performances of plays and  dramatic readings on an amateur basis.  So I requested it, and was gifted with a copy for review by Wiley Saichek.

                                        

I have to admit that the title didn't particularly appeal to me.  It seemed to imply that there would be a great deal of space devoted to the protagonist's struggle to maintain her sobriety.  I was relieved to discover that this didn't turn out to be the case.   Resisting alcohol seemed to be a relatively minor issue for the pregnant Dana Cohen.

The pregnancy itself had major impact.   Pregnancy symptoms, and the difficulties that the pregnancy caused in Dana's already troubled relationship with the baby's father seemed to dominate the book.  I was continually questioning whether this relationship was a healthy one that was worth maintaining.

 I think that many authors in the mystery field who believe women are the equals of men tend to de-emphasize any issues that might arise from pregnancy.  They don't want to appear to be disqualifying women, who might potentially be pregnant, from participation in investigation.   Readers who are looking for a crime novel that prominently focuses on the personal dimension of the protagonist's life may find Stone Cold Sober refreshingly realistic in this area.

At the outset, the case in Stone Cold Sober seems to be open and shut, but Dana has suspicions that police were missing crucial information that would lead them in a more unexpected direction.   It turned out that the perpetrator wasn't on anyone's suspect list.  This makes the third Dana Cohen novel a better than average mystery.

                                  






                         

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