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Friday, May 25, 2018

Bum Deal: Lassiter For The Prosecution

The twelfth novel in Paul Levine's Lassiter mysteries, Bum Deal, hasn't been released yet.  I'm reviewing an ARC that I received through the good graces of publicist Wiley Saichek via Net Galley.  I'm glad that I read and reviewed Bum Luck beforehand here--not only because it's an excellent book, but because it gave me some background that's important for fully appreciating the events of Bum Deal.

                               


Our hero Jake Lassiter has been through a great deal in his most recent adventure, Bum Luck.  He was probably feeling unmoored when State Attorney Raymond Pincher proposed that he prosecute a case.  Lassiter has been a defense attorney throughout his legal career, so this is a radical change.  Pincher told Lassiter that he and his entire office of prosecutors were recused from the case.  "Recused" is a legal term that I and many other Americans learned when the U.S. Attorney General recused himself last year.  It means that a lawyer can't be involved in a case because of a conflict.

Bum Deal addresses the ongoing issues of corruption in the justice system and the impact of frequent concussions on the lives of former NFL players like Jake Lassiter.  Yet it also deals with the sometimes problematic quandary of drawing the line between consensual sex and abuse, and how do you prosecute someone for murder when there's no body and no evidence?  I had to sympathize with Lassiter because it looked like a case that was impossible to win had been dumped into his lap at a very vulnerable time in his life.

If you really like plot twists in the mysteries that you read, there are a great number of them in Bum Deal.  I wondered if  this case could come to a satisfying resolution given all the obstacles that were thrown at Lassiter.  So the biggest surprise for me was that things turned out as well as they did.  I felt that justice was served in the end which is what I expect from a mystery.

                        
 


Build Me An Ark--Brenda Peterson Is The Priestess of the Peaceable Kingdom

After reading Brenda Peterson's memoir Build Me An Ark, I have to admit that my enthusiasm for Brenda Peterson is limitless.  I read this book in great gulps because I loved her thinking about animals and her experiences with them.

                             

This isn't a recent book.  Peterson describes situations for some wild animals in the late 20th century.  Their habitat and human relations with wild species have increasingly deteriorated since.    Readers should consider this book a historical account rather than a contemporary one.

Brenda Peterson's father was an employee of the U.S. Forestry Service.   Her early childhood was spent in a wilderness environment.  She encountered wild animals and felt a kinship with them.

Peterson loved the story of Noah's Ark because she interpreted the command to preserve animals to mean that animals had souls that made them worth saving.  As a child she constructed a small ark out of balsa wood and placed miniature plastic animals inside it.  She would sketch the inside of Noah's Ark as "the peaceable kingdom".  This is a utopian idea of interspecies cooperation that is derived from a prophetic Biblical passage (Isaiah 11:6).  It is supposed to happen after the coming of the Jewish messiah.  A famous depiction of "the peaceable kingdom" was painted by artist Edward Hicks in the 19th century.  The image of the painting reproduced below is public domain.

                           

Peterson includes a number of striking instances of interspecies cooperation in her memoir. The most notable is probably the research dolphin that warned Peterson's pregnant sister about the health of her baby.  She also mentions a friendship between a Siberian husky and a whale.  These are heartwarming and inspiring.

There are also sad tales like the story of the real Smokey Bear, a cub who was rescued from a forest fire and brought to live in a prison called a zoo in Washington D.C.

Just know that if you love animals and believe in animal rights advocacy, you will want to know about Brenda Peterson.

                          


                               

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Bum Luck--My Introduction to the Lassiter Mysteries

Paul Levine has written twelve mysteries focusing on Jake Lassiter.  Bum Luck is the eleventh one.  The twelfth, Bum Deal, will be released next month.  Publicist Wiley Saichek asked me to review Bum Deal, but suggested that I should read Bum Luck beforehand and sent me a free copy. This was the reverse of bum luck.   In fact, I consider it very good luck indeed.

                          

The first thing I noticed was the snappy dialogue.  Up until now my favorite dialogue in mysteries was in the Spenser novels by Robert Parker.  Lassiter's is of a different order.  It's full of pointed criticism of his own profession.

Jake Lassiter is a former linebacker in professional American football who has become a lawyer.  His having been a football player is very relevant to the plot of Bum Luck because this book deals with the tragic impact of  repeated concussions on the lives of many former football players.  Wikipedia has an article on this issue that provides a good introduction to it.  Bum Luck is also centrally concerned with corruption in the justice system.  I've seen the Lassiter series described as light, but this particular novel goes to some very dark places.

I found the characterization of Lassiter complex yet sympathetic.   Although Lassiter had done things he regrets, he seemed to me like a wounded hero which is my favorite type of protagonist. 

I had never seen frequent concussion syndrome as a theme in a novel.  I appreciated the honesty with which Levine approached this subject which lent Bum Luck a kind of raw intensity.

I considered this book both original and well-written.  I very much look forward to the digital ARC of Bum Deal that I've obtained through the good graces of Wiley Saichek via Net Galley.