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Saturday, March 24, 2018

Akata Warrior: A Predictable Fantasy Plot With Some Fascinating Glimpses

I have to issue a disclaimer.  I didn't read the book that preceded this one, Akata Witch.  I read some reviews that said that it was like Harry Potter.  Since I couldn't get past the first page of the first Harry Potter novel, this wasn't an inducement to read it. I've been reading fantasy since the 1960's.  I'm a very jaded reader who is always looking for the unusual.   It seems to me that the premise of the Harry Potter series is formulaic, and I really can't abide formula.   I nevertheless made an attempt to read Akata Witch because I have loved several of Nnedi Okorafor's books for adults.  Let's just say, I didn't get very far.

So why did I decide to read the sequel?  It sounded like it had possibilities, that it might be more complex than Akata Witch.

                   


Since I have always believed that books should stand on their own, I was pleased that there was background to bring me up to speed on what I'd missed by not reading Akata Witch.  I was introduced to Sunny, an American born girl of Nigerian descent whose family returned to Nigeria.

 Sunny is also an albino.  I researched the persecution of albinos in Africa, and was horrified by what I discovered.  See a newspaper article about the situation for albinos in Malawi in 2016. I also found a recent post on the Albino Foundation blog dealing with discrimination against albinos in Nigeria here.   Akata Warrior caused me to become more aware of this issue.

My favorite scene in this novel involved a cowrie shell divination that blew my socks off.   I would love to read more about Bola, the diviner.  She was totally awesome.   At that point in my reading of Akata Warrior, I posted on a Goodreads group that I thought it was the best book I'd read by Nnedi Okorafor.

 Unfortunately, after the divination, the narrative became predictable.   I am so bored by formula fantasy villains with no motivation except being evil.  I've been bored by them for decades. That's why I tend to avoid any book that has even a whiff of standardized fantasy about it.   So I was disappointed by Akata Warrior, but I don't regret reading it.  I loved the glimpses of Nigerian culture that Okorafor provided, and I'm very much looking forward to  Binti: The Night Masquerade.

                             
 
                             

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